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Welcome to our blog! Here you will find posts about can't miss properties, local events, and more! Here at Maple and Main Realty we pride ourselves on our knowledge of the Northampton area. Feel free to leave a comment, we would love to hear from you! If you have any questions, don't hesitate to contact us

Great New Florence Listing, Abuts Fitzgerald Lake Conservation Area

Wonderful new Maple and Main Realty listing! 65 Morningside Drive in Florence, MA, off of Country Way is a little slice of heaven! This immaculate 4 bedroom, 4 bath contemporary home sits on a lush half acre lot with mature gardens, Ipe deck with built-in seating area, bar height table and a Goshen stone patio. Meticulously maintained and beautifully updated! There is a spacious eat-in kitchen with cherry cabinets, kitchen island and stainless appliances. A master suite with a large walk-in closet and whirlpool tub in bathroom, mini splits added throughout house for cooling, upgraded closets with built-in shelving in all bedrooms, retractable screens in living room and family room, tiled-floor mudroom with skylight and built-in seating and storage. Cozy family room with working fireplace. 2 car garage and full basement for with built-in storage and workbench. This beautiful and peaceful oasis is minutes from Florence and Northampton centers, and a short walk to the paths of Fitzgerald Lake, just across North Farms Road. All of the amenities one could ask for!

Contact Julie Starr for a private showing, or come to the Open House this Sunday, June 24th from 12-2 pm! Offered at $529,900.

 
     
 
     
 
     
 
   
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
 
   
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
 
 
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
     
 

 

 
   

Gardening Tips from the Gazette!

Since our first blog post in 2013, I have cited gardening tips from Mickey Rathbun of the Daily Hampshire Gazette on an annual basis. Her column always has timely advice for us fledgling gardeners. It can feel overwhelming to establish or maintain ground cover and garden beds. Ms. Rathbun lists helpful steps, ways to prioritize, what to focus on and when to do it.  The following column also lists upcoming garden events in the Northampton area and beyond!

Mickey Rathbun: Busy time in the garden

With the unusually cold spring we’ve had, I’m having a hard time realizing that summer is upon us. Everything is growing so fast — especially weeds, it seems — you can practically see it happening. That means our gardens need lots of tending.

Some days I think: where do I even begin? Here are some tasks to tackle in the next few weeks:

Invest in a compost delivery and top dress established plants. When planting or dividing, add it liberally to the holes you dig. Your garden will thank you.

Spring-blooming shrubs should be pruned after they’re finished flowering and before they set next spring’s buds. In our area, that means by the first week of July. This includes lilacs, weigela, deutzia and certain viburnums, including the divinely fragrant Korean spice viburnum. Prune out dead or diseased branches, crossing branches and trim for overall shape and size.

Eradicate poison ivy and other pesky weeds when they’re still small. It’s almost too late to go to battle with poison ivy; it seems to have arrived full grown overnight. But if you put on your sturdiest garden gloves, long sleeves and pants and pull it out now, you’ll get a good head start on it. That goes for briars like wild blackberry that have a tendency to smother other shrubs in the landscape. After you work with poison ivy, wash thoroughly with Tech-Nu, or another similar product that neutralizes poison ivy’s toxic oil.

It’s not too early to start deadheading spring-blooming perennials such as Geum and Dicentra formosa. Sheer back perennial geraniums after they’ve bloomed. They’ll look shorn at first but will generate healthy foliage soon and sometimes produce new bloom.

Divide spring flowering perennials after they’ve bloomed.

To be thorough, water the plant well first so it’s hydrated for the upcoming disturbance. Then dig up the entire plant and pull and/or cut apart divisions. If you’re doing it the quick and dirty way, leave the entire plant in the ground and carve out divisions with a sharp trowel. 

Fill in the hole with compost and soil. Keep the divisions moist and shaded if you can’t replant them right away.

Add some compost to the new planting holes before replanting. If possible, do this on a cloudy day. Bright sun is a stressor.

I have sometimes resorted to shading new divisions with umbrellas, which works well if it’s not too windy.

If you’re careful, you can divide most perennials pretty much anytime, avoiding the period when they’re in early or full blossom. A few things, like peonies, are tricky. They do not like being disturbed. They have a deep tap root, so if you dig them, wait until fall and then be very careful to dig deeply without severing the root.

Set out hummingbird feeders. Clean them regularly and keep them filled. Make sure bird baths are full. This is especially important if we have a dry spell and birds don’t have access to puddles and other places where they can drink and bathe.

Clean the birdbaths often and refill to disrupt mosquito breeding.

Speaking of water, make sure you keep planters well-watered. They dry out quickly. And keep a close eye on newly planted shrubs and perennials, which need a steady supply of water to become well established. Water deeply and less often. A daily spritz will not reach the roots.

One thing you might not have to do just yet is to get rid of foliage from spring bulbs. The bulbs need the leaves to photosynthesize and provide nourishment for next year’s flowers. Wait until the leaves are dead before cutting them. Don’t tie them up. This will look messy for a while, but be patient.

Stay on top of your weeding and you’ll have a lot less work later in the summer. Use mulch to cover bare spots that weeds thrive in. Consider groundcovers such as Lamium maculatum (dead nettle) to fill in the gaps. It does well in dry shade once established. Depending on the site, lamium needs to be kept in check, but it’s easy enough to do that, and it’s a whole lot prettier than bare dirt and random weeds!

25th  Anniversary Forbes Library Garden Tour

This Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., consider spending a few hours enjoying the seven gardens on the Forbes Library Northampton Garden Tour. 

The event raises funds for the Friends of Forbes Library, Inc. to help finance programs and materials for the library. The tour also aims to inspire and educate garden lovers with the chance to visit a variety of appealing landscape styles and collections of garden plantings.

 This year’s gardens are located along a scenic 10-mile route, accessible by car and offering a pleasant bicycle ride. Driving directions are included with the tickets to this self-guided tour.

At each garden there will be handouts with descriptions of the plantings and volunteer garden guides on hand to answer questions. 

Tour tickets are $15 and can be purchased in advance at Forbes Library, State Street Fruit Store andCooper’s Corner in Northampton, Hadley Garden Center in Hadley, North Country Landscapes and Garden Center in Westhampton and Bay State Perennial Farm in Whately.

On the day of the tour, tickets are $20 and are available only at the library. For details:  www.forbeslibrary.org. For more information, contact: Lyn Heady at 584-7041

Garden field study

On June 19, Berkshire Botanical Garden is sponsoring a tour of two fabulous gardens in Washington, Connecticut: the beautiful, panoramic Highmeadows Garden, the private estate of Linda Allard, and Hollister House, an American interpretation of such classic English gardens as Sissinghurst, Great Dixter and Hidcote.

Linda Allard will provide a tour of her gardens at Highmeadows. A tour of Hollister House will be led by head gardener Krista Adams. 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Cost: members: $50/non-members: $65. Pre-registration required.

Participants should bring a lunch and dress for the weather. Transportation to and from BBG in Stockbridge included in the price and time.

City Spaces, Country Places Garden Tour

The 22nd annual Worcester area garden tour will take place on June 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This self-guided tour gives access to five distinctive private gardens in a variety of sites. Advance Sales: member $20/ non-member $25. Day of tour: member $30/ non-member $35. Tickets purchased by 9 a.m. June 18 will be mailed. Tickets purchased after that must be picked up at Tower Hill Botanic Gardens in Boylston. Directions to the gardens are included in the ticket. 

Smell the roses 

While you’re out Worcester way, stop by Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston and enjoy the New England Rose Society’s annual show. It takes place June 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There’s a rose sale all day and a rose planting and Q&A with Dave Cannistraro from 11 a.m. to noon. It is free with admission to Tower Hill.

Mickey Rathbun can be reached at mickey.rathbun@gmail.com.

DIY Repair Your Deck This Summer!

Now that the sun in shining, the birds are singing and the flowers are blooming - the spring real estate market is upon us! I so enjoy seeing all the new "inventory" in the Northampton area with my buyer clients. Houses seem to double in size when you include the yard, and any outdoor living spaces, such as decks, patios, pools and the like. The flip side of this increased sense of space, is that outdoor areas actually require upkeep, and this can be time consuming and expensive. It's a good idea to take stock of all that needs doing, and decide which items/projects you are willing and able to pay for (yard clean up? gutter cleaning?), and which projects you prefer to do on your own (planting new perennials?, mulching your garden beds?).

In the past week, I've happened upon a number of houses with decks in need of TLC. My first impulse as a homeowner, would be to hire a professional to deal with a weathered deck. But, in reading this piece from todays' Daily Hampshire Gazette, it seems as if freshening up ones' deck is actually a manageable DIY project!

How to repair a splintering deck

By HomeAdvisor

Thursday, May 31, 201
 
Splintering decks are usually the result of neglect — occurring after a deck remains untreated and unsealed for a number of years. The lack of protection allows water to soak into the boards, eventually causing them to splinter and crack.

Fortunately, all is not lost. It may be hard to get that brand new look back completely, but following a few simple steps can help you bring your neglected decking back to life.

Your first order of business is the easiest. Mix up a solution of half bleach, half water and spray down your entire decking. If you see areas of deck mold (not unlikely if it's been a while since your deck's been treated), hit those especially hard and work at them with a scrub brush until the mold has been removed.

Finally, wait for the deck to dry before moving on to the next step.

The bleach does two things: It kills deck mold and mildew, and it bleaches the wood to a uniform color, preparing it for treatment. If you treat a deck that's at the point of splintering without applying bleach, you'll end up with dark, unattractive decking. Using bleach will bring out the natural wood look you're trying to recover.

Once the bleach solution has dried off the deck (it's a good idea to give it about 24 hours, just to be sure), you can move on to sanding. Since splintering decks mean lots of painful slivers for bare feet, it's important that you sand down your deck so that you're once again working with a smooth surface. Renting a large floor sander will certainly speed up the job, though the railings, banisters, steps and other hard-to-reach places will probably need to be done with a hand sander or sandpaper. Finally, rent a power washer and clean off the deck. It's going to be covered in a fine layer of dust from the sanding, and you'll need to get rid of that if you want your sealer to take properly.

Once the deck has dried out a second time, you're ready to treat the deck. Using a power sprayer drastically reduces the time it takes to treat a deck, though it can be done with paint rollers and brushes if you've got the patience. Just be sure to watch out for drips and runs, and to brush them up quickly. Waiting until after the deck is dry to try to get rid of them is almost impossible. Finally, remember to treat your deck on a regular basis (at least every few years). It's the only sure-fire way to prevent problems like splintering, cracking, rot and mold.

While it's possible to repair decking yourself, it's a time-consuming and laborious job — especially if you don't have the right tools. A decking contractor is experienced enough to repair decking of all sorts, and they will also have the supplies and know-how to get it done right in a fraction of the time. For this reason, many homeowners find hiring a decking pro to be worth the extra cost.

 

Visit HomeAdvisor.com.

The Must Have Organization Item for any Home

Over the years that we have been together, my husband and I have now renovated or created 4 kitchens. Two in New York, and two in Northampton. As people who both love to cook, we have come to understand what our kitchen "must have" list includes. This has changed and expanded with time and experience. For us, one small, but important detail in a kitchen is a magnetic knife rack. We love having access to our knife collection - without having to rifle through drawers. We also love our knives and like to display them. (#kitchengeek). I was excited to come across this article in Apartment Therapy yesterday, outlining some fantastic uses for this wonderful item. Who knew that our favorite kitchen secret had so many practical uses? 

11 Uses for Magnetic Knife Racks You're Probably Overlooking

48e39e4b77bc91890dad6e882ab3235b85d24bc1?auto=compress&w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Dabney Frake
May 17, 2018
 
(Image credit: Marie-Lyne Quirion)
 

I'm prepared to say that 85% of U.S. citizens have one of these magnetic knife holders hanging somewhere in their kitchen (that's a totally made up number btw), and the other 15% should get on board. And then 100% of us should look for other places to mount them in our homes, because these simple little strips are good for so much more than just knives. Here's a whole bunch of ways they make organizing easy.

 
(Image credit: Design Sponge)

Install a magnetic knife rack inside a big cabinet, as seen on Design Sponge. It's a great way to keep track of smaller items and reduce visual clutter.

 

(Image credit: Regina Yunghans)

Regina solved one of life's little annoying problems with one of these: Where and how to store food processor attachments. This is such a clever idea for keeping sharp blades safe and out of the way.

 
(Image credit: IKEA)

IKEA, no surprise, has a lot of clever ideas on how to use them. Mount a magnetic knife rack (or two) next to the door—either vertically or horizontally—to hold keys and other important reminders before you head out the door.

 

(Image credit: Amelia Lawrence)

Amelia created a version to display photographs, memos, and other important items. A store-bought strip would work just as nicely if you don't want to take the time to DIY.

 
(Image credit: Amazon)

Install a holder inside your bathroom drawers to keep all those little hair accessories and grooming supplies in one place and within reach. This one from Amazon isn't currently available, but there are other nice wooden options for under $30.

 

(Image credit: Local Kitchen Blog)

If you aren't using the underside of your kitchen cabinets, you're missing valuable storage real estate. Mount your knives upside down, as spotted over on Local Kitchen's blog, and the strip's slim profile takes up very little room and tucks out of sight.

 

 

(Image credit: Crate & Barrel Kids)

From Crate & Barrel Kids comes this storage-meets-art idea for hanging toy race cars. Not only does it give you a place to keep all those loose ankle-sprainers, but it makes for some very fun and dramatic decor.

(Image credit: IKEA)

After cleaning your paint brushes, IKEA suggests you squeeze the water from the bristles and attach them to the magnetic strip to dry. It's a great way to keep your counters clear and clutter-free. (Although, note that it's better to store paintbrushes upside down...)

 
(Image credit: Blu Kat Kraft)

Great under-the-cabinet idea: Put some magnets on the lids of your spice jars, then attach them to knife strips mounted there. These clear options let you see what you've got, so simply unscrew the jar when you need it.

(Image credit: The Cavender Diary)

Have a garage, or a spot to work on projects? Hang a couple of these racks for loose bits, screwdrivers and other tools. This amazing set up is courtesy of the Cavender Diary.

(Image credit: Armelle)

And here's the adult version. Armelle organized her closet and decked out the back of the door with all sorts of storage solutions, including a magnet for her scissors and punches.

Apartment Therapy supports our readers with carefully chosen product recommendations to improve life at home. You support us through our independently chosen links, many of which earn us a commission.
 

New Listing - Light-filled Contemporary home in Florence, MA

201 Park Hill Road in Florence, MA

Set high above Park Hill Road is this exquisite contemporary 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath home. Commanding views of the Mt. Holyoke range married with multiple decks and individual balconies off each bedroom, bring the beauty of the outdoors right inside your living space. The living room is highlighted with cathedral ceilings and a towering brick fireplace. There are gleaming hardwood floors throughout the main floor, leading you into the master bedroom with en-suite bath, & walk in closet. Expansive concrete countertops and high end stainless steel appliances including a 6 burner Wolf stove, make this kitchen a chef's delight. Upstairs are 2 more impressive bedrooms, both with private balconies. The fully finished, walkout lower level, with a 2nd fireplace and full bath is a great space for relaxing, home office, in-law or whatever you imagine. A must see!

Offered at $688,000. Schedule your private showing with Winnie Gorman, Lisa Darragh or Scott Rebmann. Or come to the Open House this Saturday, May 12, from 12-2 pm

 

 

 


 

New Listing in Chesterfield MA - 206 Bryant Street!

Contemporary home on 17.22 bucolic acres in the heart of beautiful Chesterfield MA. This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath has all the bells and whistles! Open concept floor plan on first floor with large cook's kitchen, wood stove, dining room, family room and TV room, shaded porch and sunny deck, tiled mudroom and office/guest room across from first floor powder room. Second floor is comprised of a gracious master suite, with a large walk-in closet, 2 additional bedrooms and addtional full bath/laundry room. Walk out basement is ready to be finished, or can be used as-is. There is also a large walk up attic with ample storage space. In the spacious yard, you will find a large storage shed, fire pit, stone walls and plenty of wildlife. 12 minutes to Williamsburg, 20 to Florence, 26 to Northampton center.

Enjoy camping, hiking, skiing, fishing, horseback riding, berry-picking, bird watching and all that Chesterfield and the hill towns have to offer - as well as an abundance of cultural events and natural beauty in the nearby Berkshires. This property is approved for horses, and would be great for gardening. With an abundance of sunlight, it would likely be a great candidate for solar power too!

206 Bryant Road in Chesterfield. Offered at $399,000. Call Julie Starr to set up your private showing, or attend the open house this Saturday, May 5th from 11-1 pm.

View from the top of the driveway

Side of the house

Cook's kitchen

Wood-burning stove in living room

TV room

Master bedroom

Second bedroom

Third bedroom

 

 

 

41 Pine Island Lake in Westhampton is Back on the Market!

Back on the market with a significant price reduction -  41 Pine Island Lake in Westhampton, MA is a sweet house with a private beach. A wonderful getaway bungalow on a 1/4 acre lot on the peaceful Pine Island Lake.  This cozy home features 2 bedrooms, a newly constructed 245 square foot insulated sleeping loft with skylights, a separate office on the first floor which could be used as a third bedroom, an open concept living/dining room off of the well-equipped kitchen, a Jotul propane stove for heating and ambience. Step outside onto the spacious patio to enjoy beautiful sunsets, the private beach with great freshwater swimming, fishing and kayaking or canoeing, or just a chance to sit back and unwind and take in the views. Pine Island Lake does not allow motor boats which adds to the tranquility of the setting. The property has a large storage shed and private outdoor shower. Tight tank septic installed in 2005. 60 Gallon hot water heater installed in 2011. This home is the perfect spring/summer and early fall getaway - just 20 minutes to downtown Northampton! Offered now at $320,000. Contact Julie Starr for a private showing.

 
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
   
 

 

 

 

New Listing! 51 Pomeroy Meadow Road in Southampton, MA

 

51 Pomeroy Meadow Road in Southampton, MA, is a lovely new 3143 square foot Maple and Main Realty listing. This 3 bedroom, 2.5 updated farmhouse sits on a 0.86 acre pastoral lot. Complete with wildlife, lovely plantings, and a seasonal brook with foot bridges from the porch, deck and picture windows - this house oozes charm and character. The original part of the house was built in the 1880’s with a striking addition of kitchen and family room. The house offers many original and charming features including hardwood floors and custom built-ins as well as modern conveniences. An airy and bright kitchen with breakfast island and stone counters opens to a dramatic vaulted living and dining space with fireplace and spiral staircase. The front parlor is ideal for a home office or den and a small, cozy room upstairs is perfect for a computer room.  The separate in-law apartment for extended family or an au pair feels like its own residence - with a full kitchen, living room and bedroom above. Well maintained mechanicals with newer Viessman state-of-the art boiler. Three bay barn with workshop and a one car garage! Offered at $425,000. Contact Julie Held or Kate Iles for your private showing.

 

 

 

 

Fantastic, Flexible Listing for Sale in Downtown Northampton!

Ready to think outside the box? 72-74 Masonic Street in Northampton, MA is a wonderful downtown Northampton listing! With a recent price drop to $529,000, this flexible property could either be used as a single family, multi-family, commercial or any combination of the aforementioned property types! Most recently used as an office space, this house includes 3400 s.f. of live/work space, plus 4 deeded parking spaces. There are 5 offices and one half bath at present, as well as two separate heating and electrical systems. Bring your ideas, the sky is the limit! Contact Scott Rebmann or Lisa Darragh for a private showing.

Going Solar - Changes to Local Programs!

Northampton Area Homeowners take note, there are some important changes coming to local solar programs that may effect you. If you are thinking about adding solar power to your home or property, it seems that now might be the time to do it! Read on for more details about how new tariffs instituted by the President,�and changes to local incentive programs, might effect costs for installation and use of solar power. The following article from the Daily Hampshire Gazette lays it all out.

Environment: Changes coming to solar programs

  • Phil Crafts, left, and Joan Snowdon, both of Leverett, look toward the angled roof on their house which would not allow for the installation of rooftop solar panels, Oct. 21, 2017. Instead, they had freestanding panels installed on their property.�GAZETTE FILE PHOTO/SARAH CROSBY

By CAITLIN ASHWORTH
@kate_ashworth
Tuesday, March 13, 2018

With a tariff on solar product imports, a new incentive program in Massachusetts and a change in rates from Eversource, industries and consumers using the sun's rays to generate energy are sure to see a change.

President Donald Trump imposed a 30 percent tariff -- which took effect last month -- on solar products in an effort to revive American solar manufacturing companies and create jobs. He also put a tariff on steel and aluminum. Both materials are used to mount solar panels.

Northampton-based Valley Solar general manager Patrick Rondeau said the company quickly bought up panels before the tariff kicked in.

"We've already seen our most popular panels increase in price," Rondeau said, adding that the costs have raised 10 to 15 percent.

Rondeau said homeowners looking to convert to solar could see a 3 to 5 percent increase.

"As one of the largest residential solar companies in the U.S., we are disappointed in the decision made by the Trump administration to set a tariff on imported solar panels," David Bywater, CEO of Vivint Solar, said in a statement. "We know that 90 percent of Americans, regardless of political affiliation, overwhelmingly support the expansion of solar power because they know it's a good thing for the health of our environment and economy, as well as our energy independence."

Bywater added that the company, which has a branch in Chicopee, will continue to provide customers with a better way to create energy and priorities remain unchanged.

In Easthampton, Patrick Quinlan, CEO of the start-up company SolaBlock, said that while the company will be affected by the tariff, he's optimistic for the future.

SolaBlock manufactures "solar masonry units," concrete blocks with integrated solar electric cells, according to the company's website. Quinlan said he purchases the best products he can, but products made in the United States are limited. Some U.S. suppliers have factories overseas, he added.

Sarah Zazzaro-Williams, manager of All Energy Solar in Chicopee, said the solar industry in Massachusetts is competitive and has seen steady growth within the last few years. She said many of the people who get solar panels installed do so to save money on their home's electricity costs.

While the tariff may increase costs, both Zazzaro-Williams and Rondeau said the state's new incentive program Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target, or SMART, as well as new rates from Eversource may have a more direct impact on residents using or switching over to solar. She said many of people that get solar panels installed to save on home electricity costs.

Rondeau said "demand charges" by Eversource, which will be in effect next year, will have a greater impact on homeowners switching over to solar�than the tariff and new incentive.

Eversource

In January, the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities approved a "demand charge" for residents using solar panels to generate energy for their home. The charge is based on a consumer's peak demand over a specified time period, typically the monthly billing cycle, according to the DPU decision.

"This new charge helps ensure we collect the costs to serve distributed generation without other customers subsidizing those choosing net metering options," Eversource wrote on its website. "It also helps Eversource recover the cost to serve net metering customers. We developed the demand charge using a cost of service model that established the minimum cost to maintain system reliability."

Zazzaro-Williams and Rondeau said the charge is based off peak energy use.

"It is unfair," Rondeau said.

State solar program

Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources spokeswoman Katie Gronendyke said the SMART program will replace SREC II, the solar renewable energy credit.

"With over 2,000 megawatts of solar now installed, Massachusetts continues to lead the nation in solar deployment and clean energy innovation," Gov. Charlie Baker said in a statement last month. "Through our next solar incentive program, SMART, and our forward-thinking solar grant programs, we look forward to doubling that amount of solar and building a sustainable and affordable clean energy future for the Commonwealth."

The main difference between the two programs is that SRECs are a tradable commodity where the market price is determined by supply and demand in a particular year, and SMART is a tariff-based incentive program, according to Gronendyke.

Zazzaro-Williams said the new incentive does not offer as much benefit as the current one, adding that All Energy Solar is pushing for customers to get solar panels fast while the current incentive is still in effect.

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Caitlin Ashworth can be reached at cashworth@gazettenet.com.