Downtown Northampton

Fantastic, Flexible Listing for Sale in Downtown Northampton!

Ready to think outside the box? 72-74 Masonic Street in Northampton, MA is a wonderful downtown Northampton listing! With a recent price drop to $529,000, this flexible property could either be used as a single family, multi-family, commercial or any combination of the aforementioned property types! Most recently used as an office space, this house includes 3400 s.f. of live/work space, plus 4 deeded parking spaces. There are 5 offices and one half bath at present, as well as two separate heating and electrical systems. Bring your ideas, the sky is the limit! Contact Scott Rebmann or Lisa Darragh for a private showing.

Northampton Touted in Yankee Magazine!

It's so much fun to happen upon articles in well known publications, touting the many highlights of our fair city of Northampton. Last week, my mother sent me a link to this article in Yankee Magazine, which muses about whether one *could* live here. We say yes! Read on to remind yourselves of the many reasons why you live here, and love it!

Northampton, Massachusetts | Could You Live Here?

When temperatures dip into the single digits, the college town of Northampton, Massachusetts, turns up the heat.

Annie Graves • January 2, 2018 • Read Comments (3) 

    

A young visitor lets off some steam in the Palm House--aka A young visitor lets off some steam in the Palm House—aka “the Jungle Room”—at Smith College’s Lyman Plant House and Conservatory.

Mark Fleming

On the coldest day of the winter, which is soon to lead into the coldest night, we head south from New Hampshire in search of personal climate change. Seventy miles later, we check into the Hotel Northampton, climb the hill that rises toward Smith College, and spiral up an icy-cold staircase to heaven. Or, more specifically, East Heaven. As in, Hot Tubs.

Up here in the clouds (actually, the rooftop), steam billows from a bubbling wooden cauldron that sits high over Northampton. Vapor curls into the dark, frigid air. Snow is falling, the temps hovering around 8 degrees. A pale, misty moon is barely visible above the private enclosure that surrounds our percolating pool. My hair stiffens and freezes, and I couldn’t be happier … or warmer. The air feels sharp enough to shatter—and I don’t care. Which is probably what any number of East Heaven customers have felt since 1981, when Ken Shapiro and Scott Nickerson opened this Japanese-style bathhouse. “I took more hot tubs than showers growing up,” quips Shapiro’s son, Logan, who now helps run the business: four indoor tubs and four outdoor ones, plus a spa.

One of the eight hot tubs at East Heaven.

One of the eight hot tubs at East Heaven.

Mark Fleming

Oddly, the thermostat seems to be rising all over town—cranking up even to, one might say, a tropical intensity. Blocks away from East Heaven’s 104-degree tubs, in the heart of the Smith College campus, a Victorian confection sits amid the swirling snow: It’s the 19th-century Lyman Plant House and Conservatory, shaking off winter with a humid canopy of cacao, banana, and rubber trees in its kid-magnet Palm House, nicknamed “the Jungle Room.” Close by, the transcendent Hungry Ghost Bread, effectively a bakery sauna, emits clouds of yeasty moisture whenever a customer steps inside. Cozy bookstores meld heat, escapism, and—in the case of Raven Used Books—classical music to conjure a mini vacation from the chill. And we’re just warming up.

clockwise from top left: Comfy digs in the Hotel Northampton's newer Gothic Garden building; one-of-a-kind lighting fixtures at custom furniture shop Sticks & Bricks; the atrium at the Hotel Northampton, whose guests have included David Bowie and the Dalai Lama; an artful latte alongside Kahl�a fallen chocolate souffl� at the Roost.

Clockwise from top left: Comfy digs in the Hotel Northampton’s newer Gothic Garden building; one-of-a-kind lighting fixtures at custom furniture shop Sticks & Bricks; the atrium at the Hotel Northampton, whose guests have included David Bowie and the Dalai Lama; an artful latte alongside Kahlúa fallen chocolate soufflé at the Roost.

Mark Fleming

The Setting 

This vibrant Western Massachusetts town is planted in the fertile Pioneer Valley, bordered by farmland, traversed by the Connecticut River, and surrounded by a constellation of top-notch schools—specifically, the famed Five College Consortium (Smith, Mount Holyoke, Amherst, Hampshire, and UMass Amherst). Anchoring and overlooking Northampton is Smith College, founded in 1871, its pretty campus well within walking distance of a downtown brimming with shops and cafés, many decades old. Smith alums who wandered these streets include Gloria Steinem, Sylvia Plath, and Julia Child. Calvin Coolidge was mayor here, from 1910 to 1911, before becoming our 30th president in 1923. One local writer observes: “We’re in the country, but it’s cultured. We’ve got fantastic libraries and a great book culture, but you can also have a yard and be near a forest.”

 

A view of the c.�1895 conservatory, which houses 3,000-plus species of plants from around the world.

A view of Smith College’s c. 1895 conservatory, which houses 3,000-plus species of plants from around the world.

Mark Fleming

The Social Scene 

The café life is exactly what you’d imagine in an energized college town, with a robust mix of students and professor types taking their MacBooks out for a spin and cozying up to lattes. But art lovers can also find inspiration: The Smith College Museum of Art’s impressive collection includes Monet, Picasso, Rodin, Degas, and Cézanne, and a year’s membership brings unlimited admission to high-quality escapism. Locals can volunteer to lead tours at the Lyman Plant House after intensive training in basic botany and the history of the garden, according to a volunteer. Moms and dads troop through the greenhouses with children eager to visit their favorite rooms. “This is mine,” says Langston, a lively 3½-year-old who’s engulfed by giant foliage in the Palm House (although he’s partial to the cacti in the Succulent House, too). “We come here once a month, and he runs through the rain forest,” says his mother, Sally. “I know other people like to come here and be contemplative….”

 

Opened on Market Street in 2011, the Roost caters to a variety of appetites with everything from breakfast sandwiches to milkshakes to wine and beer.

 

Opened on Market Street in 2011, the Roost caters to a variety of appetites with everything from breakfast sandwiches to milkshakes to wine and beer.

Mark Fleming

Eating Out 

Snow is still pelting down as we slip into the Roost, where steamy windows and wood-plank rusticity meet “Rooster Rolls” stuffed with egg, bacon, avocado, or possibly whipped gorgonzola (making the Food Network very happy and earning its props for “best breakfast between bread”). At Haymarket Café, midway up Main Street, contented vegetarians are still squeezing around the postage stamp–size tables (as they have since 1991), surrounded by eccentric wall art, the air alive with the hiss of espresso in the making. Casual ethnic eateries abound—including Amanouz Café, serving bursts of Moroccan flavor. A sprint through town reveals further options of Indian, Greek, French, Japanese, Thai, Mexican, Italian, and Vietnamese cuisines. But if fresh bread is your holy grail, Hungry Ghost Bread is the destination. “Artisanal” and “wood-fired” are weak words for conveying the crack of this crust, the moist cushion within, and the otherworldliness of a cranberry-maple turnover that somehow fell into our bag.

Head baker J. Stevens loading the first batch of the day at Hungry Ghost Bread.

Head baker J. Stevens loading the first batch of the day at Hungry Ghost Bread.

Mark Fleming

Shopping 

We found plenty of excuses to duck indoors, such as Sticks & Bricks, with its artwork, jewelry, and sleek furniture made from reclaimed materials, and Pinch, offering unusual wall art, ceramics, curated clothing, and airy home decor. Thornes Marketplace packs dozens of stores and eateries under one roof, including Paul and Elizabeth’s, a vegetarian mainstay since 1978. Scattered around Northampton is enough reading material to get anyone through winter—Broadside Bookshop, for instance, lines its walls with quality reads plus smart political stickers—but for hours of browsing, nothing beats descending into the cozy den of Raven Used Books. Abundance spills out of the shelves and onto the floor; “Middle English Texts” sits next to “Arrrrgh!” (pirates). It’s an oasis of calm, and an exploration set to the soundtrack of Handel’s Water Music.

Owner Betsy Frederick at Raven Used Books, a haven for local academics and bibliophiles.

Owner Betsy Frederick at Raven Used Books, a haven for local academics and bibliophiles.

Mark Fleming

Real Estate 

At the time of our visit, a stylish two-bedroom townhouse-style condo in a c. 1900 building once known as the Union Street Jailhouse, offering exposed brick walls and a short walk to downtown, listed at $246,888. A breezy four-bedroom renovated 1950s colonial, with granite kitchen counters and proximity to Childs Park, was selling for $399,000. And a two-bedroom eco-friendly contemporary condo with a rooftop deck, less than a mile from the Smith campus, also listed at $399,000.

Uniquely Northampton

Apart from being able to luxuriate at East Heaven (and take a free half-hour tub on your birthday), we barely scratched the surface of Northampton’s local perks. Every type of music and performance venue is represented here, from intimate institutions like the Iron Horse Music Hall to the venerable Academy of Music, the oldest municipally owned theater in the country (c. 1891), which showcases talent ranging from Irish songbird Mary Black to the witty David Sedaris. As for the visual arts scene, it explodes at the twice-yearly Paradise City Arts Festival, an extravaganza of 200-plus top-notch craftspeople and fine artists that’s been dazzling shoppers since 1995. 

Getting Your Bearings 

Just off Main Street, in the center of town, the elegant Hotel Northampton—a member of Historic Hotels of America—is ideally situated for sampling every tropical diversion. And for depths of coziness on a winter’s night, descend into Wiggins Tavern, the hotel’s 1786 tavern (moved from its original site in Hopkinton, New Hampshire), for an incomparably warming Indian pudding. 

 

March with Maple and Main during the Noho Pride March!

Dear FOMMR (Friends of Maple and Main Realty)

Please come join us this Saturday for Noho Pride's Parade and Pride Event in downtown Northampton, MA! The event starts at 12 pm. Check out the Noho Pride website here for parade route and other important information.

Walkers are welcome to join us! Ideally walkers will wear some variation of orange or orange/yellow (Maple and Main Realty colors). There will be orange/yellow balloons, a large Maple and Main Realty banner and at least 10 gregarious and appreciative Maple and Main Realtors to walk with!!!

Let's meet at 11 in the parking lot behind Brewery, look for the Maple and Main Realty banner - close to the ticket dispenser closest to the Brewery.

See you then!

Gorgeous, Historic Downtown Northampton Condo - Price Reduced!

I've said it before and I'll say it again - 2 Pomeroy Terrace, Unit 3 in Northampton is a special and unique property! A seamless mix of historic and modern elements blend together to create a cozy, yet spacious, and beautiful home. A stone's throw to all that Northampton has to offer, and conveniently located within a mile of the entrance to 91 - this 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath condo has so much to offer! Newly reduced price of $399,900! This is a must-see unit! 

- Beautifully maintained grounds and building.

- Healthy financial picture for this well-established condo association. No special assessments expected for the foreseeable future

- 1 bay garage for each unit, with ample parking for a second vehicle.

- Subletting allowed (though all units are currently owner-occupied).

- Condo association is pricing central air right now. Buy now and opt-in for central air in Unit 3.

- This unit has a beautifully remodeled 4 year old kitchen, but has the most original architectural details in the building. Dentil moldings, pocket doors, parquet floors, hand-carved mantle piece, etc.

- Cool, peaceful downstairs bedrooms with hardwood floors and exposed brick. Laundry downstairs in unit as well.

Contact Julie Starr to set up a showing!

 

Living Room with curved seating area and original (restored) windows

Pocket doors and hand carved fireplace mantle - looking into dining room and kitchen from living room

Dining room into kitchen

Remodeled kitchen with custom cabinetry and granite countertops - views of Mt. Tom in the distance.

Kitchen into dining room

Cozy master bedroom

Pocket doors and parquet floors

Hand-carved mantlepiece from the mid-1800s.

Exposed brick, hardwood floors and storage closets in lower level.

​

 

 

Shaw's Motel Demolished to Make Way for New Condominiums in Downtown Northampton

The historic Shaw's Motel was demolished on Monday, December 20th, to make way for 12 new condominiums in downtown Northampton, MA. It's exciting to contemplate how this will change the landscape of our fair city!

Though the Shaw's Motel had become an eyesore along Bridge Street leading into downtown Northampton, MA due to many years of neglect - some Northampton locals in the proceeding article wax nostalgic about the hotel and the era it represented to them - most notably, the great compassion of Josephine Shaw, former owner of the hotel.

Former Shaw’s Motel demolished 

By AMANDA DRANE

Tuesday, December 20, 2016 - Daily Hampshire Gazette

Shaw's Motel

PHOTO CREDIT: GAZETTE STAFF / KEVIN GUTTING​

NORTHAMPTON — On Monday Shaw’s Motel went the way of one of many words spray-painted on the dilapidated building’s front side — to “dust.”

Condos will soon replace the iconic former motel, which long served as a sanctuary to the city’s mentally ill under the compassionate reign of Josephine Shaw before it was condemned in 2012.

Charlie Arment Trucking Inc. demolished the former motel and began dismantling a garage behind it on Monday. Work continues Tuesday, said Building Commissioner Louis Hasbrouck, as the company takes down the large, white multifamily Pomeroy Terrace home adjacent to the property at 87 Bridge St.

Hampden County businessman Matthew Campagnari, who bought the properties in July 2015, said he’ll construct three duplexes on the former motel site and the adjacent lot. For a total of 12 condos, he said he’s also renovating the yellow building at the corner of Pomeroy Terrace and Bridge Street.

As for the famous Shaw’s sign, Campagnari said he certainly won’t throw it away.

The Monday demolition stopped traffic as passers-by stopped to gawk and take pictures from car windows. Sounds of breaking glass echoed through the city’s Ward 3 as an excavator’s toothed arm reached past the structure, reducing ever more of it to a pile of jagged edges. Dust billowed.

A bird of prey circled overhead as Shaw’s made its last stand. The old motel may have taken years to build, but it only took about 45 minutes to take down.

For Charlie Arment employees, the destruction was business as usual.

“They all fall the same,” supervisor Otis Porter said as he helped guide the excavator.

While many hailed the demolition as a positive move for the city, longtime neighborhood residents reflected on what they call the “end of an era.”

Hasbrouck said the rotting building was erected during the 1800s, and Donald and Josephine Shaw opened it as Shaw’s Motel in 1951.

Jerry Budgar, a Bridge Street resident who grew up in the neighborhood, said the building coming down Tuesday used to be his grandparents’ house.

“Frankly, I have never spent a day on this Earth that that motel wasn’t there,” said Budgar, 70. “It certainly is the end of an era.”

Budgar said Josephine Shaw, who provided low-cost housing to dozens of mentally ill tenants from the 1960s through the ’90s, showed kindness when the state turned a cold shoulder to the city’s institutionalized patients.

The state hospital on Village Hill closed in the early ’90s, but the gradual process of emptying its wards began long before.

“She became mother, confessor and mentor and everything else,” he said, adding she’d stroll around the property, always with tenants in tow. “She looked like mother duck and her goslings.”

He said for many people who had nowhere else to go, the motel was home and Shaw was family.

“She was a great lady — she had a heart the size of Wyoming,” he said. “You don’t have people like that around too much these days.”

Shaw died at 95 in 2013.

Budgar said the motel did what the state failed to do — house and help those in need of nurturing.

“Why did the state just basically open the door, throw them onto the street and leave them there?” he asked. “To me it was almost criminal what happened. They were wandering the street. They didn’t know what to do — they just weren’t prepared for life.”

Neighborhood resident Julianna Tymoczko, 41, said watching the city’s more eccentric personalities from the vantage point of her childhood home on Pomeroy Terrace shaped her understanding of the mentally ill. On Monday she recalled the “suntan man,” a former resident of the Shaw’s who she said would sunbathe shirtless on Main Street in all seasons.

“It certainly colors my whole perspective on mental health care and treatment in this country,” she said of growing up near Shaw’s.

The memories are bittersweet, but Ward 3 City Councilor Jim Nash called new developments at the old Shaw’s property a force for good.

“I think neighbors by and large are happy to see development move forward,” he said. “This is a step forward.”

Hasbrouck said there’s no arguing the motel, whose last tenant left six years ago, was in ghastly condition, but still, watching it come down, he couldn’t help but feel somber.

“I’m always sad to see buildings come down,” he said. “They’d outlived their usefulness, but it’s still sad. Part of what’s sad is to see the memories associated with it go away.”

Amanda Drane can be contacted at adrane@gazettenet.com.

Two More Local Events for Your Calendar! Northampton and Easthampton.

Tonight, December 9th, from 6:30 until late in the Ballroom at Eastworks in Easthampton - STRUT, "a flamboyant fashion spectacle" and a reboot of Easthampton's annual "Light Up the Arts" Holiday Party, and includes a fashion show, live performances, art installations, a dance party and silent auction. It sounds like it will be a fantastic way to ring in the holiday season! This event is an ECA (Easthampton City Arts) fundraiser.

 

East Works Sign

 

Tomorrow, December 8th from 4-9 pm. The Northampton 2016 Holiday Stroll hosted by the Downtown Northampton Association looks as if it's shaping up to be an exciting event. There will be performances, shopping, artwork to view and make, and food. Main Street will be CLOSED to cars and trucks during the event. So get your parking spot ahead of time and plan to dress warmly and be on foot. All municipal lots will be open and accessible. Check out the hot link above for full details. 


Northampton Holiday Stroll Lights

 

72-74 Masonic Street in Downtown Northampton. Fantastic Investor Opportunity!

72-74 Masonic Street in Northampton, MA has two bathrooms, one on each level, 4 separate entrances and 7 dedicated parking spaces. It is 2,614 s.f. and sits on a 0.06 acre lot.

Fantastic investor opportunity in downtown Northampton, with parking, just behind Mosaic Cafe! This two story building is currently used as an attorney's office with 23 employees. It could be used in a similar capacity by the new owner, or it could be broken up into 7 smaller offices for rent to individual professionals or artists. Another option is that it could be divided into 2-4 individual residential rental units, or perhaps a mixture of offices and residential rentals? Potential for an Air B+B unit, etc. The possibilities are endless!

Included below are the seller's designs for expansion, with architect's renderings. Own a little piece of vibrant downtown Northampton, in the heart of everything that the city has to offer! Offered at $700,000. Contact Lisa Darragh or Winnie Gorman to set up a showing or ask questions.

Photos of current building, followed by architect's renderings:

72-74 Masonic Street North Hampton current exterior   72-74 Masonic St North Hampton current interior
     
72-74 Masonic St interior   72-74 masonic st dining room
 
72-74 masonic st north hampton architect rendering
     
72-74 masonic street north hampton architect rendering exterior   72-74 masonic street architect rendering exterior 2