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It's OK to Get Outside, If You Take Proper Precautions

Hello Friends of Maple and Main Realty! We hope you are finding some silver linings in this surreal moment in history. Time in the garden, clearing out your basement, reading a good book, time with your nuclear family, zoom calls with loved ones, walks with dogs? Real Estate IS still happening, but inventory is limited, since any seller who lives in their house is unlikely to open it to the public at this time. We are still seeing empty houses and new construction coming on the market. Clients are relying more on video tours of homes vs. in person visits - though those, too, can happen! All buyers must wear masks and gloves and showings are staggered so that only one party is in the house at a time. 

On another note, since public parks are in MA closed due to the pandemic, people are looking for other ways to get outside. There are numerous conservation areas with walking paths to explore here in Western MA. This article from MassLive highlights a one mile walking path in the Silvio Conti Wildlfe Refuge in Hadley. There is also a link to other areas to explore at the end of the article. 

 

 

 

Got cabin fever? Walk this Silvio Conte refuge trail

by Steve Smith

HADLEY — Visitors to the Fort River division of the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge can observe wildlife, get an education in the environment or simply enjoy the trail.

Conte represented Massachusetts’ 1st District for 32 years. An avid sportsman, environmentalist and fisherman, the Pittsfield native introduced the federal legislation that created the refuge to preserve and protect the Connecticut River watershed. The refuge is comprised of nearly 40,000 acres within parts of Massachusetts, Vermont, Connecticut and New Hampshire.The Fort River division of the Conte refuge is named after the body of water that flows through it. Fort River is the longest free-flowing tributary to the Connecticut River in Massachusetts.

It is a one-mile trail with wooden observation decks so visitors can pause and take a front-row seat to nature. It’s accessible. On the difficulty scale of easy to moderate to strenuous to you-need-to-give-up-all-desserts, this trail is a piece of cake. No hills. Wide, smooth paths. No roots to walk over. No tree limbs to block your way.

Before you go to the Fort River or any trail, here are some answers to questions you might have:

Is it safe to go outside?

Yes, as long as you practice social or physical distancing. By now, you know the drill. That means you must maintain at least six feet of distance from anyone you might meet outside.

Really? Won’t there by other people on the trail?

Yes, that’s possible. Maybe even likely. But imagine meeting a bear on the trail. Chances are he’s more afraid of you than you are of him, and he’ll move away. Be alert. If you hear people coming on the trail, move off the trail They’ll likely do the same. So no headphones. And if you see a lot of cars in the parking lot or lots of cars parked alongside the road next to the trail entrance, come back later or another day because the trail is probably too crowded.

Do I need to go by myself?

No. You should be safe with anyone in your immediate family. If you binged watched episodes of Tiger King on television or completed a 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzle with the person during the days leading up to your cabin fever, it’s probably safe to bring them along.

How about Massachusetts state parks? Are they still open?

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker is urging people to stay home as much as possible to avoid person-to-person contact, but he acknowledges individuals and families need to get outside to walk, hike, jog or bike. State parks and other natural resources managed by the state Department of Conservation and Recreation are mostly open and accessible to the public. There is currently no vehicular access to the Quabbin Reservoir. Elsewhere, playgrounds, fitness areas, visitor centers and bathroom facilities are closed, as are coastal beach parking areas. Find the latest updates and restrictions at: mass.gov/orgs/department-of-conservation-recreation

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