home improvement

DIY while Hunkering Down - Pandemic Activities for Homeowners

For my 16-year-old daughter's birthday last month, I turned two of her embroidery projects (new COVID hobby) into decor for her bedroom, as a present to her (a pillow and a wall hanging). She was thrilled! Both of us have been spending time, while hunkering down, working on crafts, bedroom redecorating (in her case) organizing and decluttering (in my case) and repainting (in my case). It isn't surprising that many of us, while stuck inside with only virtual social lives, have turned to DIY projects to improve our homes (and expend creative energy). This article in the New York Times by Ronda Kaysen describes some really interesting and impressive DIY projects completed in the greater New York area. So, whether you are a Northampton area homeowner interested in readying your home for the market, or someone who just wants to put some creative energy into making your home the most comfortable and functional place it can be - this article may be of interest. And, speaking of Northampton Area Homeowners - NOW is a GREAT time to have one of our agents come give you an opinion of market value for your home! It is a buzzing seller's market out there!

Extreme D.I.Y. for Home Decor

Since they have spent so much time at home in the last year, some homeowners have taken craft and design projects to a new level.

Jen Rondeau didn’t set out to turn her laundry room into a psychedelic disco lounge, but now that it looks like one, she’s very pleased with herself.

It all started in early January as demand for the homemade masks she had been selling since last spring dwindled and Ms. Rondeau, an artist and musician, found herself without a creative outlet. So she turned her attention to the gray utilitarian room in the basement of her West Orange, N.J. home.

Over three days, she painted an abstract midcentury design along one wall, a bold mix of red, blues, pinks and oranges. Smitten with the results, she extended the design on the opposite side, set an orange chair in the corner and set up a disco light machine that plays a flashing light sequence in time with whatever music she pumps through her Bluetooth speaker.

“I had a lot of energy that I needed to put into something,” said Ms. Rondeau, 43, who lives in the four-bedroom ranch-style house with her husband, Paul Rondeau, 42, a freelance cinematographer, and their two young sons. Now that the laundry room is painted, “I want to be in there,” she said. “It makes me happy.”

Miss going to the movies? There’s no time like the present to turn the basement into a home theater with a full concession stand. No room for a soaker tub in a tiny bathroom? No matter. Install one in the bedroom instead. Do the children have cabin fever? There’s no time like the present to bring an ice-skating rink to the front yard.

For these homeowners, pandemic do-it-yourself projects have been liberating, tapping unrealized artistic talents, or honing ones they’ve nurtured for years. Their homes have become not just a space they want to occupy, but one they can mold to their creative vision.

“I’m seeing a lot more color, a lot more of a sense of adventure in décor choices. People are like, ‘I don’t have anywhere else to go, I might as well look at something interesting while I’m home,’” said Ingrid Fetell Lee, a designer and the author of “Joyful: The Surprising Power of Ordinary Things to Create Extraordinary Happiness.”

Leanne Ford, an interior designer and a star of the HGTV show “Home Again with the Fords,” sees this as a moment for homeowners to relinquish some of their pre-pandemic expectations. What’s the point of a guest room if you have no guests? “We don’t need to decorate how we were living a year ago, we need to decorate for how we’re living now,” she said.