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Welcome to our blog! Here you will find posts about can't miss properties, local events, and more! Here at Maple and Main Realty we pride ourselves on our knowledge of the Northampton area. Feel free to leave a comment, we would love to hear from you! If you have any questions, don't hesitate to contact us

The Must Have Organization Item for any Home

Over the years that we have been together, my husband and I have now renovated or created 4 kitchens. Two in New York, and two in Northampton. As people who both love to cook, we have come to understand what our kitchen "must have" list includes. This has changed and expanded with time and experience. For us, one small, but important detail in a kitchen is a magnetic knife rack. We love having access to our knife collection - without having to rifle through drawers. We also love our knives and like to display them. (#kitchengeek). I was excited to come across this article in Apartment Therapy yesterday, outlining some fantastic uses for this wonderful item. Who knew that our favorite kitchen secret had so many practical uses? 

11 Uses for Magnetic Knife Racks You're Probably Overlooking

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Dabney Frake
May 17, 2018
 
(Image credit: Marie-Lyne Quirion)
 

I'm prepared to say that 85% of U.S. citizens have one of these magnetic knife holders hanging somewhere in their kitchen (that's a totally made up number btw), and the other 15% should get on board. And then 100% of us should look for other places to mount them in our homes, because these simple little strips are good for so much more than just knives. Here's a whole bunch of ways they make organizing easy.

 
(Image credit: Design Sponge)

Install a magnetic knife rack inside a big cabinet, as seen on Design Sponge. It's a great way to keep track of smaller items and reduce visual clutter.

 

(Image credit: Regina Yunghans)

Regina solved one of life's little annoying problems with one of these: Where and how to store food processor attachments. This is such a clever idea for keeping sharp blades safe and out of the way.

 
(Image credit: IKEA)

IKEA, no surprise, has a lot of clever ideas on how to use them. Mount a magnetic knife rack (or two) next to the door—either vertically or horizontally—to hold keys and other important reminders before you head out the door.

 

(Image credit: Amelia Lawrence)

Amelia created a version to display photographs, memos, and other important items. A store-bought strip would work just as nicely if you don't want to take the time to DIY.

 
(Image credit: Amazon)

Install a holder inside your bathroom drawers to keep all those little hair accessories and grooming supplies in one place and within reach. This one from Amazon isn't currently available, but there are other nice wooden options for under $30.

 

(Image credit: Local Kitchen Blog)

If you aren't using the underside of your kitchen cabinets, you're missing valuable storage real estate. Mount your knives upside down, as spotted over on Local Kitchen's blog, and the strip's slim profile takes up very little room and tucks out of sight.

 

 

(Image credit: Crate & Barrel Kids)

From Crate & Barrel Kids comes this storage-meets-art idea for hanging toy race cars. Not only does it give you a place to keep all those loose ankle-sprainers, but it makes for some very fun and dramatic decor.

(Image credit: IKEA)

After cleaning your paint brushes, IKEA suggests you squeeze the water from the bristles and attach them to the magnetic strip to dry. It's a great way to keep your counters clear and clutter-free. (Although, note that it's better to store paintbrushes upside down...)

 
(Image credit: Blu Kat Kraft)

Great under-the-cabinet idea: Put some magnets on the lids of your spice jars, then attach them to knife strips mounted there. These clear options let you see what you've got, so simply unscrew the jar when you need it.

(Image credit: The Cavender Diary)

Have a garage, or a spot to work on projects? Hang a couple of these racks for loose bits, screwdrivers and other tools. This amazing set up is courtesy of the Cavender Diary.

(Image credit: Armelle)

And here's the adult version. Armelle organized her closet and decked out the back of the door with all sorts of storage solutions, including a magnet for her scissors and punches.

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New Listing - Light-filled Contemporary home in Florence, MA

201 Park Hill Road in Florence, MA

Set high above Park Hill Road is this exquisite contemporary 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath home. Commanding views of the Mt. Holyoke range married with multiple decks and individual balconies off each bedroom, bring the beauty of the outdoors right inside your living space. The living room is highlighted with cathedral ceilings and a towering brick fireplace. There are gleaming hardwood floors throughout the main floor, leading you into the master bedroom with en-suite bath, & walk in closet. Expansive concrete countertops and high end stainless steel appliances including a 6 burner Wolf stove, make this kitchen a chef's delight. Upstairs are 2 more impressive bedrooms, both with private balconies. The fully finished, walkout lower level, with a 2nd fireplace and full bath is a great space for relaxing, home office, in-law or whatever you imagine. A must see!

Offered at $688,000. Schedule your private showing with Winnie Gorman, Lisa Darragh or Scott Rebmann. Or come to the Open House this Saturday, May 12, from 12-2 pm

 

 

 


 

New Listing in Chesterfield MA - 206 Bryant Street!

Contemporary home on 17.22 bucolic acres in the heart of beautiful Chesterfield MA. This 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath has all the bells and whistles! Open concept floor plan on first floor with large cook's kitchen, wood stove, dining room, family room and TV room, shaded porch and sunny deck, tiled mudroom and office/guest room across from first floor powder room. Second floor is comprised of a gracious master suite, with a large walk-in closet, 2 additional bedrooms and addtional full bath/laundry room. Walk out basement is ready to be finished, or can be used as-is. There is also a large walk up attic with ample storage space. In the spacious yard, you will find a large storage shed, fire pit, stone walls and plenty of wildlife. 12 minutes to Williamsburg, 20 to Florence, 26 to Northampton center.

Enjoy camping, hiking, skiing, fishing, horseback riding, berry-picking, bird watching and all that Chesterfield and the hill towns have to offer - as well as an abundance of cultural events and natural beauty in the nearby Berkshires. This property is approved for horses, and would be great for gardening. With an abundance of sunlight, it would likely be a great candidate for solar power too!

206 Bryant Road in Chesterfield. Offered at $399,000. Call Julie Starr to set up your private showing, or attend the open house this Saturday, May 5th from 11-1 pm.

View from the top of the driveway

Side of the house

Cook's kitchen

Wood-burning stove in living room

TV room

Master bedroom

Second bedroom

Third bedroom

 

 

 

41 Pine Island Lake in Westhampton is Back on the Market!

Back on the market with a significant price reduction -  41 Pine Island Lake in Westhampton, MA is a sweet house with a private beach. A wonderful getaway bungalow on a 1/4 acre lot on the peaceful Pine Island Lake.  This cozy home features 2 bedrooms, a newly constructed 245 square foot insulated sleeping loft with skylights, a separate office on the first floor which could be used as a third bedroom, an open concept living/dining room off of the well-equipped kitchen, a Jotul propane stove for heating and ambience. Step outside onto the spacious patio to enjoy beautiful sunsets, the private beach with great freshwater swimming, fishing and kayaking or canoeing, or just a chance to sit back and unwind and take in the views. Pine Island Lake does not allow motor boats which adds to the tranquility of the setting. The property has a large storage shed and private outdoor shower. Tight tank septic installed in 2005. 60 Gallon hot water heater installed in 2011. This home is the perfect spring/summer and early fall getaway - just 20 minutes to downtown Northampton! Offered now at $320,000. Contact Julie Starr for a private showing.

 
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
   
 

 

 

 

New Listing! 51 Pomeroy Meadow Road in Southampton, MA

 

51 Pomeroy Meadow Road in Southampton, MA, is a lovely new 3143 square foot Maple and Main Realty listing. This 3 bedroom, 2.5 updated farmhouse sits on a 0.86 acre pastoral lot. Complete with wildlife, lovely plantings, and a seasonal brook with foot bridges from the porch, deck and picture windows - this house oozes charm and character. The original part of the house was built in the 1880’s with a striking addition of kitchen and family room. The house offers many original and charming features including hardwood floors and custom built-ins as well as modern conveniences. An airy and bright kitchen with breakfast island and stone counters opens to a dramatic vaulted living and dining space with fireplace and spiral staircase. The front parlor is ideal for a home office or den and a small, cozy room upstairs is perfect for a computer room.  The separate in-law apartment for extended family or an au pair feels like its own residence - with a full kitchen, living room and bedroom above. Well maintained mechanicals with newer Viessman state-of-the art boiler. Three bay barn with workshop and a one car garage! Offered at $425,000. Contact Julie Held or Kate Iles for your private showing.

 

 

 

 

Fantastic, Flexible Listing for Sale in Downtown Northampton!

Ready to think outside the box? 72-74 Masonic Street in Northampton, MA is a wonderful downtown Northampton listing! With a recent price drop to $529,000, this flexible property could either be used as a single family, multi-family, commercial or any combination of the aforementioned property types! Most recently used as an office space, this house includes 3400 s.f. of live/work space, plus 4 deeded parking spaces. There are 5 offices and one half bath at present, as well as two separate heating and electrical systems. Bring your ideas, the sky is the limit! Contact Scott Rebmann or Lisa Darragh for a private showing.

Going Solar - Changes to Local Programs!

Northampton Area Homeowners take note, there are some important changes coming to local solar programs that may effect you. If you are thinking about adding solar power to your home or property, it seems that now might be the time to do it! Read on for more details about how new tariffs instituted by the President,�and changes to local incentive programs, might effect costs for installation and use of solar power. The following article from the Daily Hampshire Gazette lays it all out.

Environment: Changes coming to solar programs

  • Phil Crafts, left, and Joan Snowdon, both of Leverett, look toward the angled roof on their house which would not allow for the installation of rooftop solar panels, Oct. 21, 2017. Instead, they had freestanding panels installed on their property.�GAZETTE FILE PHOTO/SARAH CROSBY

By CAITLIN ASHWORTH
@kate_ashworth
Tuesday, March 13, 2018

With a tariff on solar product imports, a new incentive program in Massachusetts and a change in rates from Eversource, industries and consumers using the sun's rays to generate energy are sure to see a change.

President Donald Trump imposed a 30 percent tariff -- which took effect last month -- on solar products in an effort to revive American solar manufacturing companies and create jobs. He also put a tariff on steel and aluminum. Both materials are used to mount solar panels.

Northampton-based Valley Solar general manager Patrick Rondeau said the company quickly bought up panels before the tariff kicked in.

"We've already seen our most popular panels increase in price," Rondeau said, adding that the costs have raised 10 to 15 percent.

Rondeau said homeowners looking to convert to solar could see a 3 to 5 percent increase.

"As one of the largest residential solar companies in the U.S., we are disappointed in the decision made by the Trump administration to set a tariff on imported solar panels," David Bywater, CEO of Vivint Solar, said in a statement. "We know that 90 percent of Americans, regardless of political affiliation, overwhelmingly support the expansion of solar power because they know it's a good thing for the health of our environment and economy, as well as our energy independence."

Bywater added that the company, which has a branch in Chicopee, will continue to provide customers with a better way to create energy and priorities remain unchanged.

In Easthampton, Patrick Quinlan, CEO of the start-up company SolaBlock, said that while the company will be affected by the tariff, he's optimistic for the future.

SolaBlock manufactures "solar masonry units," concrete blocks with integrated solar electric cells, according to the company's website. Quinlan said he purchases the best products he can, but products made in the United States are limited. Some U.S. suppliers have factories overseas, he added.

Sarah Zazzaro-Williams, manager of All Energy Solar in Chicopee, said the solar industry in Massachusetts is competitive and has seen steady growth within the last few years. She said many of the people who get solar panels installed do so to save money on their home's electricity costs.

While the tariff may increase costs, both Zazzaro-Williams and Rondeau said the state's new incentive program Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target, or SMART, as well as new rates from Eversource may have a more direct impact on residents using or switching over to solar. She said many of people that get solar panels installed to save on home electricity costs.

Rondeau said "demand charges" by Eversource, which will be in effect next year, will have a greater impact on homeowners switching over to solar�than the tariff and new incentive.

Eversource

In January, the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities approved a "demand charge" for residents using solar panels to generate energy for their home. The charge is based on a consumer's peak demand over a specified time period, typically the monthly billing cycle, according to the DPU decision.

"This new charge helps ensure we collect the costs to serve distributed generation without other customers subsidizing those choosing net metering options," Eversource wrote on its website. "It also helps Eversource recover the cost to serve net metering customers. We developed the demand charge using a cost of service model that established the minimum cost to maintain system reliability."

Zazzaro-Williams and Rondeau said the charge is based off peak energy use.

"It is unfair," Rondeau said.

State solar program

Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources spokeswoman Katie Gronendyke said the SMART program will replace SREC II, the solar renewable energy credit.

"With over 2,000 megawatts of solar now installed, Massachusetts continues to lead the nation in solar deployment and clean energy innovation," Gov. Charlie Baker said in a statement last month. "Through our next solar incentive program, SMART, and our forward-thinking solar grant programs, we look forward to doubling that amount of solar and building a sustainable and affordable clean energy future for the Commonwealth."

The main difference between the two programs is that SRECs are a tradable commodity where the market price is determined by supply and demand in a particular year, and SMART is a tariff-based incentive program, according to Gronendyke.

Zazzaro-Williams said the new incentive does not offer as much benefit as the current one, adding that All Energy Solar is pushing for customers to get solar panels fast while the current incentive is still in effect.

�
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Caitlin Ashworth can be reached at cashworth@gazettenet.com.

Great New Listing in Florence Center!

We have a new listing at 8 Middle Street, Florence MA. This immaculate and cozy 2-family home, reads like a single family home with an attached apartment. The main unit is comprised of a beautifully appointed living/dining room - complete with recessed lighting and beautiful built-ins, made by the owner (a renowned local furniture maker) . The downstairs also includes a spacious kitchen, butler's pantry and large, renovated full bath with laundry. The basement has a finished media room/play space. The upstairs includes 2 sweet bedrooms, a large full bath and gracious master bedroom, with cathedral ceilings and a lofted studio/office. The attached apartment is a well lit, one bedroom with off-street parking, a spacious entry hall, large eat-in kitchen and full bath with laundry. Sliders lead out to a private, fenced deck. The house sits on a lovely, large, flat, fenced lot, complete with beautiful landscaping and artistic touches such as the custom welded doorway into the yard. This special property could easily be converted back to a single family home, but it also works well as an owner-occupied 2 family. There are lovely artistic touches throughout. This downtown Florence location can't be beat!

The current owners have taken meticulous care of the property - inside and out. Contact Julie Starr to set up a private showing, or come to the open house this Saturday, March 3rd from 11-1 pm.

Offered at $449,000

Main Entrance, Dining Room

Dining Room

Living Room

Kitchen

Living Room 

Kitchen

Bathroom, custom built ins

Kid Bedroom #1

Kid bedroom #2

Upstairs Hallway

Master Bedroom

Master Bedroom from Loft

Lofted office/studio

Finished basement

Finished basement, built ins

Custom welded gateway to backyard

Apartment entrance hall/mudroom

Apartment living room, sliders to private deck

Apartment bath/laundry room

 

 

 

 

Northampton Touted in Yankee Magazine!

It's so much fun to happen upon articles in well known publications, touting the many highlights of our fair city of Northampton. Last week, my mother sent me a link to this article in Yankee Magazine, which muses about whether one *could* live here. We say yes! Read on to remind yourselves of the many reasons why you live here, and love it!

Northampton, Massachusetts | Could You Live Here?

When temperatures dip into the single digits, the college town of Northampton, Massachusetts, turns up the heat.

Annie Graves • January 2, 2018 • Read Comments (3) 

    

A young visitor lets off some steam in the Palm House--aka A young visitor lets off some steam in the Palm House—aka “the Jungle Room”—at Smith College’s Lyman Plant House and Conservatory.

Mark Fleming

On the coldest day of the winter, which is soon to lead into the coldest night, we head south from New Hampshire in search of personal climate change. Seventy miles later, we check into the Hotel Northampton, climb the hill that rises toward Smith College, and spiral up an icy-cold staircase to heaven. Or, more specifically, East Heaven. As in, Hot Tubs.

Up here in the clouds (actually, the rooftop), steam billows from a bubbling wooden cauldron that sits high over Northampton. Vapor curls into the dark, frigid air. Snow is falling, the temps hovering around 8 degrees. A pale, misty moon is barely visible above the private enclosure that surrounds our percolating pool. My hair stiffens and freezes, and I couldn’t be happier … or warmer. The air feels sharp enough to shatter—and I don’t care. Which is probably what any number of East Heaven customers have felt since 1981, when Ken Shapiro and Scott Nickerson opened this Japanese-style bathhouse. “I took more hot tubs than showers growing up,” quips Shapiro’s son, Logan, who now helps run the business: four indoor tubs and four outdoor ones, plus a spa.

One of the eight hot tubs at East Heaven.

One of the eight hot tubs at East Heaven.

Mark Fleming

Oddly, the thermostat seems to be rising all over town—cranking up even to, one might say, a tropical intensity. Blocks away from East Heaven’s 104-degree tubs, in the heart of the Smith College campus, a Victorian confection sits amid the swirling snow: It’s the 19th-century Lyman Plant House and Conservatory, shaking off winter with a humid canopy of cacao, banana, and rubber trees in its kid-magnet Palm House, nicknamed “the Jungle Room.” Close by, the transcendent Hungry Ghost Bread, effectively a bakery sauna, emits clouds of yeasty moisture whenever a customer steps inside. Cozy bookstores meld heat, escapism, and—in the case of Raven Used Books—classical music to conjure a mini vacation from the chill. And we’re just warming up.

clockwise from top left: Comfy digs in the Hotel Northampton's newer Gothic Garden building; one-of-a-kind lighting fixtures at custom furniture shop Sticks & Bricks; the atrium at the Hotel Northampton, whose guests have included David Bowie and the Dalai Lama; an artful latte alongside Kahl�a fallen chocolate souffl� at the Roost.

Clockwise from top left: Comfy digs in the Hotel Northampton’s newer Gothic Garden building; one-of-a-kind lighting fixtures at custom furniture shop Sticks & Bricks; the atrium at the Hotel Northampton, whose guests have included David Bowie and the Dalai Lama; an artful latte alongside Kahlúa fallen chocolate soufflé at the Roost.

Mark Fleming

The Setting 

This vibrant Western Massachusetts town is planted in the fertile Pioneer Valley, bordered by farmland, traversed by the Connecticut River, and surrounded by a constellation of top-notch schools—specifically, the famed Five College Consortium (Smith, Mount Holyoke, Amherst, Hampshire, and UMass Amherst). Anchoring and overlooking Northampton is Smith College, founded in 1871, its pretty campus well within walking distance of a downtown brimming with shops and cafés, many decades old. Smith alums who wandered these streets include Gloria Steinem, Sylvia Plath, and Julia Child. Calvin Coolidge was mayor here, from 1910 to 1911, before becoming our 30th president in 1923. One local writer observes: “We’re in the country, but it’s cultured. We’ve got fantastic libraries and a great book culture, but you can also have a yard and be near a forest.”

 

A view of the c.�1895 conservatory, which houses 3,000-plus species of plants from around the world.

A view of Smith College’s c. 1895 conservatory, which houses 3,000-plus species of plants from around the world.

Mark Fleming

The Social Scene 

The café life is exactly what you’d imagine in an energized college town, with a robust mix of students and professor types taking their MacBooks out for a spin and cozying up to lattes. But art lovers can also find inspiration: The Smith College Museum of Art’s impressive collection includes Monet, Picasso, Rodin, Degas, and Cézanne, and a year’s membership brings unlimited admission to high-quality escapism. Locals can volunteer to lead tours at the Lyman Plant House after intensive training in basic botany and the history of the garden, according to a volunteer. Moms and dads troop through the greenhouses with children eager to visit their favorite rooms. “This is mine,” says Langston, a lively 3½-year-old who’s engulfed by giant foliage in the Palm House (although he’s partial to the cacti in the Succulent House, too). “We come here once a month, and he runs through the rain forest,” says his mother, Sally. “I know other people like to come here and be contemplative….”

 

Opened on Market Street in 2011, the Roost caters to a variety of appetites with everything from breakfast sandwiches to milkshakes to wine and beer.

 

Opened on Market Street in 2011, the Roost caters to a variety of appetites with everything from breakfast sandwiches to milkshakes to wine and beer.

Mark Fleming

Eating Out 

Snow is still pelting down as we slip into the Roost, where steamy windows and wood-plank rusticity meet “Rooster Rolls” stuffed with egg, bacon, avocado, or possibly whipped gorgonzola (making the Food Network very happy and earning its props for “best breakfast between bread”). At Haymarket Café, midway up Main Street, contented vegetarians are still squeezing around the postage stamp–size tables (as they have since 1991), surrounded by eccentric wall art, the air alive with the hiss of espresso in the making. Casual ethnic eateries abound—including Amanouz Café, serving bursts of Moroccan flavor. A sprint through town reveals further options of Indian, Greek, French, Japanese, Thai, Mexican, Italian, and Vietnamese cuisines. But if fresh bread is your holy grail, Hungry Ghost Bread is the destination. “Artisanal” and “wood-fired” are weak words for conveying the crack of this crust, the moist cushion within, and the otherworldliness of a cranberry-maple turnover that somehow fell into our bag.

Head baker J. Stevens loading the first batch of the day at Hungry Ghost Bread.

Head baker J. Stevens loading the first batch of the day at Hungry Ghost Bread.

Mark Fleming

Shopping 

We found plenty of excuses to duck indoors, such as Sticks & Bricks, with its artwork, jewelry, and sleek furniture made from reclaimed materials, and Pinch, offering unusual wall art, ceramics, curated clothing, and airy home decor. Thornes Marketplace packs dozens of stores and eateries under one roof, including Paul and Elizabeth’s, a vegetarian mainstay since 1978. Scattered around Northampton is enough reading material to get anyone through winter—Broadside Bookshop, for instance, lines its walls with quality reads plus smart political stickers—but for hours of browsing, nothing beats descending into the cozy den of Raven Used Books. Abundance spills out of the shelves and onto the floor; “Middle English Texts” sits next to “Arrrrgh!” (pirates). It’s an oasis of calm, and an exploration set to the soundtrack of Handel’s Water Music.

Owner Betsy Frederick at Raven Used Books, a haven for local academics and bibliophiles.

Owner Betsy Frederick at Raven Used Books, a haven for local academics and bibliophiles.

Mark Fleming

Real Estate 

At the time of our visit, a stylish two-bedroom townhouse-style condo in a c. 1900 building once known as the Union Street Jailhouse, offering exposed brick walls and a short walk to downtown, listed at $246,888. A breezy four-bedroom renovated 1950s colonial, with granite kitchen counters and proximity to Childs Park, was selling for $399,000. And a two-bedroom eco-friendly contemporary condo with a rooftop deck, less than a mile from the Smith campus, also listed at $399,000.

Uniquely Northampton

Apart from being able to luxuriate at East Heaven (and take a free half-hour tub on your birthday), we barely scratched the surface of Northampton’s local perks. Every type of music and performance venue is represented here, from intimate institutions like the Iron Horse Music Hall to the venerable Academy of Music, the oldest municipally owned theater in the country (c. 1891), which showcases talent ranging from Irish songbird Mary Black to the witty David Sedaris. As for the visual arts scene, it explodes at the twice-yearly Paradise City Arts Festival, an extravaganza of 200-plus top-notch craftspeople and fine artists that’s been dazzling shoppers since 1995. 

Getting Your Bearings 

Just off Main Street, in the center of town, the elegant Hotel Northampton—a member of Historic Hotels of America—is ideally situated for sampling every tropical diversion. And for depths of coziness on a winter’s night, descend into Wiggins Tavern, the hotel’s 1786 tavern (moved from its original site in Hopkinton, New Hampshire), for an incomparably warming Indian pudding. 

 

Lovell House New Condominium Complex at 32 North Prospect St in Amherst!

Lovell House Condominiums at 32 North Prospect Street in Amherst, MA, is a new condominium complex, specifically designed for buyers who are looking for an intelligently crafted home, with high quality, energy efficient heating and cooling systems and elegant finishes, right in heart of downtown Amherst. The complex will ultimately consist of 6 units, 4 of which are new construction, and two in the fully renovated, historic Gothic Cottage.  At present, Unit 4 and Unit 5 are currently listed on MLS. Unit 3 is not yet on MLS but construction is nearing completion.  Unit 5 is slightly smaller than Unit 4, at 1785 sq. ft., this space includes 3 bedrooms, 3 full baths, a private backyard, and a small front court yard. Each unit will offer its own distinct character and personality. This quiet and peaceful setting is just steps from the library, cinema, shops and restaurants in vibrant Amherst MA.

The historic nature of the original house, "The Gothic Cottage", adds an interesting twist to this development, The design of the cottage may be inspired by A.J. Downing's pattern books, and employs romantic whimsy in combining Second Empire features with those of the Gothic Revival. This property is part of the Prospect-Gaylord Historic District of Amherst, which was designated a National Register Historic District on 2/4/93

Historic Gothic Cottage. Will be completely renovated to include 2 condos.

The following photos are of 32 North Prospect St, Unit 4 - This brand new 1865 sq. ft. unit includes 3 bedrooms, 3 full baths and a one-car attached garage, private backyard space and small front court yard. Charming archways and built-ins, a cozy fireplace, 9 ft. ceilings, a skylight, high-end finishes, stainless appliances and a full basement complete the picture.

 

For more information, or to schedule a showing, contact Kate Iles or Karen McAmis.